Obsolete Carlin Oil Burners

Burners Listed So Far Are:

Carlin "99 CRD"

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Nozzle & Air Band Settings with Burnham "V" Series Boilers

Boiler

Model

Firing

Rate

Fan Size

Diam. x Width

Air Band

Setting

Air Shutter

Setting

Head Adjustment Dim. "A"

Nozzle Data

GPH

Angle

Type

Mfg.

V-13A

0.75

5 1/4" x 2"

25%

Blank

0

0.75

60*

AR

Monarch

V-14A

1.05

5 1/4" x 2"

35%

Blank

2

1.00

60*

AR

Monarch

V-15A

1.35

5 1/4" x 2"

60%

Blank

3

1.35

60*

R

Monarch

V-16A

1.65

5 1/4" x 2"

80%

Blank

4

1.65

60*

R

Monarch

V-17A

1.90

5 1/4" x 2"

100%

100%

4

1.75

60*

R

Monarch

V-18A

2.10

5 1/4" x 2"

100%

100%

6

2.00

60*

R

Monarch

V-1-72

0.60

5 1/4" x 2"

10%

Blank

0

0.60

60*

AR

Monarch

V-1-92

0.80

5 1/4" x 2"

30%

Blank

1

0.85

60*

AR

Monarch

Safety Note: If the internal air shutter is still in place remove it!

Carlin "100 & 101 CRD"

The model's 100 & 101 CRD are identical with the only exception the size of the Blower Wheel (fan) and Firing Rates.

Model No.

Fan Size

Firing Rate (GPH)

100 CRD

4 1/4"Dia. x 2 7/8" Wide

0.50 - 2.25

101 CRD

4 3/4"Dia. x 2 7/8" Wide

1.75 - 2.75

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To check the electrode settings specified as follows:

1/8-inch Gap, 1/4- inch above the nozzle centerline,

3/16-inch ahead of the nozzle tip. (See figure to left)

 

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"A" Style Air Tube

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Standard Air Tube Design

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Retention Ring Setting

Recommended Settings for Model 100 CRD (Std. Tube)

Firing Rate (GPH) @100psi

Retention Ring          Setting        Dia."A" inches

     Air Control Settings

% Opening    Air Shutter

% Opening     Air Band

0.50

0

0

0

0.65

0

50

0

0.75

Min 0

90

0

Max 1/16

80

0

0.85

Min 0

100

0

Max 1/16

85

0

1.00

Min 1/16

100

25

Max3/16

90

0

1.10

Min 1/16

100

100

Max 3/16

100

15

1.25

Min 1/16

100

100

Max 1/4

100

20 

1.35

Min 1/4

100

100

Max 3/8

100

20

1.50

Min 5/16

100

100

Max 7/16

100

25

1.65

Min 3/8

100

100

Max 1/2

100

30

1.75

Min

100

100

Max 9/16

100

50

2.00

Min 1/2

100

100

Max 5/8

100

50

2.25

Min 5/8

100

100

Max 11/16

100

100

 

Nozzle Specifications 100 & 100 w/ Std. Tube

Firing Rates (GPH)@100psi

Spray Type

Make

0.65, 0.75

0.50, 060, 0.65, 0.75

0.50, 0.60, 0.65, 0.75

60* AR

60* H or 70* H

70* A

Monarch

Hago

Delavan

0.85 - 2.75

0.85 - 2.75

0.85 - 2.75

0.85 - 2.75

70* S, 70* S

60* SS,  45* SS, 45* H

70* B,  60*B

70* R,  60*R

Steinen

Hago

Delavan

Monarch

H = Hollow,  SS = Semi-Solid Hago, A = Hollow, B = Solid Delavan, R = Solid Monarch, AR = Semi-Solid Monarch, S = Solid Steinen

 

Recommended Settings Model 101 CRD w/ Std Tube

Firing Rate (GPH) @100psi

Retention Ring Setting (Dia."A"inches)

Air Control Settings

% Opening Air-Shutter

% Opening Air-band

1.75

3/8

100

50

2.00

7/16

100

100

2.25

1/2

100

100

2.50

9/16

100

100

2.75

5/8

100

100

 

Recommended Settings Model 100 w/ "A" Tube

Firing Rate (GPH)

Retention Ring Setting Dia."A"inches

Air Control Settings

% Opening Air-Shutter

% Opening Air-Band

0.50

0

0

0

0.65

0

70

0

0.75

1/16

100

0

0.85

1/16

100

100

1.00

1/16 - 1/8

100

100

1.10

1/8 - 3/16

100

100

1.25

3/16

100

100

1.35

3/16 - 1/4

100

100

1.50

1/4 - 5/16

100

100

1.65

5/16 - 3/8

100

100

1.75

3/8 - 7/16

100

100

2.00

1/2 - 9/16

100

100

2.25

5/8 - 11/16

100

100

 

Nozzle Specifications for  Model 100 CRD w/ "A" Tube

Firing Rate (GPH)

Spray Type

Manufacturer

0.50 - 0.75

60*, 70*, 80* H

80* A

60*, 70*, 80* H or Q

Hago

Delavan

Steinen

0.85 - 2.25

60*, 70*, 80* H

60*, 70*, 80* A

60*, 70*, 80* H or Q

Hago

Delavan

Steinen

H = Hollow,  SS = Semi-Solid Hago, A = Hollow, B = Solid Delavan, R = Solid Monarch, AR = Semi-Solid Monarch, S = Solid Steinen

 

Additional Instructions for Model 100 CRD

In May, 1983 the burner housing, Carlin part no. 1001, used on model 100 CRD was altered

to incorporate a simpler means of adjusting the combustion head assembly.

Use these additional instructions along with the standard Installation and Operating Instructions.

How to Adjust the Combustion Head

By moving the electrode and combustion head assembly forward or backward,

the location of the flame retention ring relative to the throttle ring can be controlled.

The throttle ring on the "A" style air tube is incorporated into the air cone.

By reading the scale embossed in the housing, which is calibrated in 1/16-inch divisions,

the position of the flame retention ring to the throttle ring can be determined at a glance.

By loosening the locking screw & thumb-nut and turning the adjusting screw using a 5/32 inch allen wrench,

the assembly can be moved to the required position.

To lock in place, first tighten the thumb-nut and then the locking screw.

Air Shutter

In the Fall of 1985, the adjustable air shutter was replaced with two fixed air shutters.

One fully closed, part no.1007-1, and one fully open, part no. 1007-2.

Both air shutters are held in place by the fuel unit.

The blank air shutter is used when the firing between 0.50 - 1.75 GPH.

The open air shutter is used when firing between 1.35 - 2.25 GPH.

 

Preliminary Air Settings

Firing Rate (GPH)

Standard Air Tube Design

"A" Style Air Tube Design

Blank Air Shutter

Open Air Shutter

Blank Air Shutter

Open Air Shutter

Air-Band % Open

Head Dia."A"

Air-Band %Open

Head Dia."A"

Air-Band %Open

Head Dia."A"

Air-Band %Open

Head Dia."A"

0.50

20

0

-

-

20

0

-

-

0.60

35

0

-

-

35

0

-

-

0.65

40

0

-

-

40

0

-

-

0.75

45

0

-

-

50

0-1

-

-

0.85

50

1

-

-

70

1

-

-

1.00

100

1

-

-

90

2

-

-

1.10

100

1-2

-

-

100

2-3

-

-

1.20

100

2

-

-

100

3

-

-

1.25

100

2

-

-

100

3-4

-

-

1.35

100

3

100

2

100

4

100

3

1.50

100

4

100

3

100

6

100

5

1.65

100

6

100

4

100

8

100

6

1.75

100

7

100

4-5

100

9

100

6-7

2.00

-

-

100

6-7

-

-

100

8-9

2.25

-

-

100

9

-

-

100

11

Editors note: The Carlin 100 CRD is still in limited production

Carlin 400N

The 400N is (was) available in two models with firing ranges and fan & air cone sizes as follows:

Model

Firing Range G.P.H.

Fan Dia.
& Width

Air Cone
I.D.

400N-2

0.65 - 2.00

5-3/4' x 4" 

2-11/16"

400N-3

1.50 - 3.00

6-5/16" x 4"

3-1/8"

Nozzles 

60* Hollow Cone Spray are recommended.

 

Electrode Settings

Spark gap at bends of electrodes - 1/8" apart

Electrode wire tips - flush with Nozzle and 1/2" above the center Line of the nozzle

 

Caution

The angle of the blades on the diffuser is fixed at the factory and should not be changed.

If the setscrew holding the air diffuser is loosened,

make certain when tightening this setscrew that no part of the air diffuser touches the

porcelains and  that the distance between the nozzle and a line drawn across the flame retention ring is 1/4".

 

Burner Setting

The burner should be set so that the face of the air cone is flush with the inside face of the combustion

chamber.  A slight downward pitch of the air tube will prevent any after drip from running back to

the fan housing.

 

Adjustments

Aside from the conventional air shutter adjustment, the only other adjustment on the 400N series is the position of the flame retention ring in relation to the burner end cone. This adjustment is controlled  by the combustion head adjustment screw in the burner back plate. (fig. 1)

Under no conditions should the Air cone extend into the chamber Preliminary settings should be made so that the outer rim of the flame retention ring is flush with or ahead of the air cone. (see Table)

 

Model

Nozzle
Firing Rates

Retention Ring
to Air Cone

400N-2

0.65 - 1.00
1.10 - 1.50
1.65 - 2.00

Flush
1/8" Ahead
3/16" Ahead

400N-3

1.50 - 1.75
2.00 - 2.25
2.50 - 3.00

3/16" Ahead
1/4" Ahead
3/8" Ahead

The adjustment of the flame retention ring with relation to the air cone should be from a flush position to no more 1/2" beyond the face of the end cone. In the final adjustment of both air shutter and the flame retention ring, with the ignition off the flame should burn about 1/8" off the flame retention ring in a complete and even ring of fire.

Intermittent ignition is recommended.

Although the actual amount of adjustment is only approximately 1/2" - 5/8", there are two noticeable changes that can occur during the adjustment.

1. The fire can be forced away from the retention ring if the ring is drawn back into the air cone rather than flush as with the 400N-2 at low firing rate and approximately 3/16" ahead as with the 400N-3 at the low firing rate.

2. The fire will appear to be erratic, uncontrolled and smoky if the flame retention ring has not been advanced forward in accordance with the nozzle size.

Referring to the preliminary settings as shown, it is noted that as the nozzle size increases the flame retention ring extends further ahead of the air cone. As the the retention ring is moved forward, the area is increased between the outer edge of the flame ring and the circumference of the the air cone opening; consequently, a greater volume of air is admitted to support proper combustion. The angled vanes of the retention ring in conjunction with the air diffuser, which is located in the air cone, combine to provide the proper air pattern for flame stability and positive ignition.

Carlin "S" Series

(One of my favorite all time burners - jcg)

Model

Capacity (GPH)

Spray Angle

150SF-2

0.65 to 1.35

80* Hollow only

400S-2

0.75to 1.75

80* Hollow only

400S-3

1.75 to 3.00

60* Hollow only

500S-35

3.00 to 4.50

Dual 60* Hollow

600S-4

3.00 to 5.00

Dual 60* Hollow

700S-35

3.50 to 7.00

Dual 60* Hollow

800S-4

4.00 to 8.00

Dual 60* Hollow

2000S-5

7.00 to 12.00

Dual 60* Hollow

Ignition -- Intermittent ignition is required with "S" series burners.

Burner Setting -- Allow a clearance of 1/2" to 3/4" between the burner air tube and the combustion chamber burner tube opening. Set burner so that the secondary air cone at no point is more than 1/2" back from the inside face of the combustion chamber. However under no conditions should the secondary air cone extend into the combustion chamber. Fill in the air space around the air tube and air cone with refractory cement. An excellent mixture for this purpose is dry asbestos* with about 20% Portland Cement plus enough water to make the mixture workable. ( see Fig. 1) *(I guess they didn't know about asbestos back then - jcg)

It is absolutely essential that no particles of cement become lodged on the inner surfaces of the air cone or finned collar as such particles will distort the air pattern which in turn will distort the flame and result in lower efficiency. Before applying the the insulating material at this point remove the electrode and combustion assembly and block up the inside of the end of the air tube and air cone wit a rag, pulling it out into the chamber after the insulating material has set up.

Due to the high temperatures developed by the "S: series burners, it is essential on each installation that the air cone be entirely protected wit refractory in order that it may not be subjected to the temperatures developed in the combustion chamber. If this precaution is not taken, the air cone and other parts will, in time, disintegrate. This insulating should be so applied that when viewing the inside front wall of the chamber by means of a flame mirror, one sees no tube and no part of the air cone but rather only a hole with the nozzle etc. inside.

Preliminary Adjustment of Primary Air Supply -- Air is supplied to the Primary Air Tube (5) through holes in the Primary Air Tube Holder (6)and the Primary Air Tube Control Ring (7). The air supply can be varied over a considerable range by varying the degree of register of the holes in the Primary Air Tube and the Primary Air Ring by rotation of the later. The amount of primary air required will vary with the size of the fuel oil nozzle. Excessive primary air will result in the flame burning too far from the secondary air cone and will tend to produce a noisy fire, whereas a deficiency in the primary air will result in the flame "striking back" and burning in a bright ring just in front of the Outer Primary Air Cone (3) which may eventually cause carbonization of the oil nozzle.

The following table will serve as a guide for adjusting the primary air hole openings before firing the burner.

 

Model

Firing Rate

Approximate Opening

150SF-2

0.65 to 0.85

Half Open

1.00 to 1.35

Fully Open

400S-2

0.75 to 120

Half Open

1.25 to 1.75

Fully Open

400S-3

1.75 to 3.00

Fully Open

500S-35

3.00 to 3.50

Half Open

4.00 to 4.50

Fully Open

700S-35

3.50 to 4.50

One-Third Open

5.00 to 5.50

Half Open

6.00 to 8.00

 Fully Open

800S-4

4.00 to 4.50

One-Third Open

5.00 to 5.50

Half Open

6.00 to 8.00

Fully Open

2000S-5

7.00 to 8.00

One-Third Open

8.50 to 9.00

 Half Open

10.00 to 12.00

Fully Open

The purpose of the primary air holes is to position the fire from the end cone. It does not shape the fire. The shaping of the fire is controlled by the position of the primary air tube (Part No. 5 - Fig 9 & 11) in relationship to the secondary air cone.

 

Part No.

  1. Secondary Air Cone

  2. Finned Collar

  3. Outer Primary Air Cone

  4. Inner Primary Air Cone

  5. Primary Air Tube

  6. Primary Air Tube Holder

  7. Primary Air Control Ring

  8. Electrode Holder

Adjustment -- Set fan air shutter tentatively 1/4 to 3/4 open depending upon nozzle size. Fire burner. After ignition has gone off, loosen combustion head and nozzle line lock nut and turn adjusting screw (usually clockwise) until flame becomes blow torch in shape (Fig 2) Control of flame has been lost at this point and adjustment to this condition is utilized only for a reference point from which to adjust to the proper operating condition. Using a flame mirror to observe the distance of the fire from the secondary air cone and also its shape, turn the adjusting screw counter-clockwise until flame assumes hollow cone form. Directly before the most efficient cone shaped fire is obtained a slight amount of feathering will occur (Fig 3). From this point the adjusting screw should be turned counter-clockwise very slowly until the feathering disappears (Fig 4).




General Comments -- The operating results from an "S" series burner are excellent provided the burner is installed and adjusted in accordance with the above instructions. Boiler or Furnace will remain clean during the heating season. Any tendency toward carbon formation on the combustion head is due to one or more of the following reasons.

  1. Nozzle set more than 3/8" back from outer primary air cone (part no 3 Fig 9 & 11) causing oil spray to strike cones. Adjust to 3/8"

  2. Insufficient primary air.

  3. Wild spray from nozzle striking head cones, poor spray shape, dirty nozzle or low pump pressure. Do not alter pump pressure unless gauge is used.

  4. Back pressure in firebox or insufficient over-fire draft.

  5. After-fire nozzle drip . Poor pump shut off, solenoid valve not operating or air in oil lines.

  6. Delayed ignition. Points not properly adjusted (Figs 8, 9 10 & 11).

  7. Primary air tube adjusted back too far causing oil spray to strike secondary air cone.

  8. Nozzle not properly centered in relationship to the primary air tube.

  9. Secondary air cone set back more than 1/2" from inside face of combustion chamber.

After installing, servicing or adjusting, recycle burner several times under normal operating conditions and observe flame after ignition goes off to make sure flame burns proper distance from secondary air cone.

The purpose of the primary air holes is to position the fire from the end cone. It does not shape the fire. The shaping of the fire is controlled by the position of the primary air tube (Part No. 5 - Fig 9 & 11) in relationship to the secondary air cone.

 

Part No.

  1. Secondary Air Cone

  2. Finned Collar

  3. Outer Primary Air Cone

  4. Inner Primary Air Cone

  5. Primary Air Tube

  6. Primary Air Tube Holder

  7. Primary Air Control Ring

  8. Electrode Holder

Adjustment -- Set fan air shutter tentatively 1/4 to 3/4 open depending upon nozzle size. Fire burner. After ignition has gone off, loosen combustion head and nozzle line lock nut and turn adjusting screw (usually clockwise) until flame becomes blow torch in shape (Fig 2) Control of flame has been lost at this point and adjustment to this condition is utilized only for a reference point from which to adjust to the proper operating condition. Using a flame mirror to observe the distance of the fire from the secondary air cone and also its shape, turn the adjusting screw counter-clockwise until flame assumes hollow cone form. Directly before the most efficient cone shaped fire is obtained a slight amount of feathering will occur (Fig 3). From this point the adjusting screw should be turned counter-clockwise very slowly until the feathering disappears (Fig 4).




General Comments -- The operating results from an "S" series burner are excellent provided the burner is installed and adjusted in accordance with the above instructions. Boiler or Furnace will remain clean during the heating season. Any tendency toward carbon formation on the combustion head is due to one or more of the following reasons.

  1. Nozzle set more than 3/8" back from outer primary air cone (part no 3 Fig 9 & 11) causing oil spray to strike cones. Adjust to 3/8"

  2. Insufficient primary air.

  3. Wild spray from nozzle striking head cones, poor spray shape, dirty nozzle or low pump pressure. Do not alter pump pressure unless gauge is used.

  4. Back pressure in firebox or insufficient over-fire draft.

  5. After-fire nozzle drip . Poor pump shut off, solenoid valve not operating or air in oil lines.

  6. Delayed ignition. Points not properly adjusted (Figs 8, 9 10 & 11).

  7. Primary air tube adjusted back too far causing oil spray to strike secondary air cone.

  8. Nozzle not properly centered in relationship to the primary air tube.

  9. Secondary air cone set back more than 1/2" from inside face of combustion chamber.

After installing, servicing or adjusting, recycle burner several times under normal operating conditions and observe flame after ignition goes off to make sure flame burns proper distance from secondary air cone.